Michael Lacy: Mathematician Helping Students Achieve Their Goals

Mathematician and Professor, Michael Lacy, has made numerous contributions to the field of mathematics. Graduating from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with a Ph.D. in 1987, Michael focused his thesis on the areas of probability in Banach spaces and solving problems concerning the laws of iterated logarithm for empirical characteristic functions.

Throughout his collegiate tenure Michael concentrated his efforts mainly on the subjects of probability, ergodic theory and harmonic analysis.

After college, Michael Lacy would go on to work at Louisiana State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he nearly perfected the central limit theorem.

Aside from his due diligence in mathematics, Michael has been awarded numerous accolades for his studious contributions. Learn more about Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey: http://people.math.gatech.edu/~lacey/

At Indiana University, where he worked at from 1989-1996, he received the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship award; he also received the Salem Prize, an award that stemmed from his study of the bilinear Hilbert transform. Later in 2004, Michael earned the Guggenheim Fellowship award, working alongside colleague Xiaochun Li.

Today, you can find Michael on the campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he works as a Professor of Mathematics. Although Michael’s passion can seen through his mathematical teachings, he’s also held positions that have allowed countless opportunities for students to continue their education, such as being the Director of Training grants like the VIGRE and MCTP awards, given from the NSF program.

In addition to serving as a director in support of undergraduates, graduate students and postdocs, Michael lends his services as a mentor and advisor to many of his students; most of whom go on to have successful careers in academia and mathematical related industries. Read more: Michael Lacey | Wikipedia and Michael Lacey |Math Alliance

A fellow NSF graduate who was mentored by Michael Lacy’s under the NSF grant program, had this to say about him: “Thank you for the help, guidance and motivation you’ve given me, and for the recommendations you have written on my behalf. I have much to be thankful for and could not have gotten this award without you.”

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